The Portrait of the Trickster in Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

Authors

  • Asst. Lecturer Mohammed Saad Qasim Alasadi Mustansiriah Uni., College of Basic https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6884-5016
  • Ass. L. Rua’a Ali Mahmood Alazzawi Middle Technical Uni., Technical College of Management, Dept. of Accounting

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.31185/lark.Vol3.Iss51.3236

Keywords:

Trickster, rebellion, authority, insanity, Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

Abstract

This paper explores the significance of the trickster as a character in post-modern literature, with a specific focus on Ken Kesey's renowned novel, "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest." (1962). The trickster archetype holds a prominent position in literature. It represents rebellion, wit, and transformative actions. Through an analysis of Kesey's portrayal of the trickster as a character, the paper delves into the importance of the trickster's role in challenging authority and effecting change within the confines of mental institutions. In "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," the trickster manifests itself in the form of Randle McMurphy, a rebellious figure who defies the oppressive authority of Nurse Ratched and the institutional system. The paper highlights the paradoxical nature of McMurphy as a trickster with a noble dimension. Though employs various tactics, such as humor, rebellion, and manipulation, his ultimate goal is to empower the patients and restore their individuality. Kesey's portrayal of the trickster character demonstrates its importance in post-modern literature as a vehicle for critiquing oppressive systems and inspiring transformative change. 

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References

Bibliography

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Published

2023-09-30

Issue

Section

west languages

How to Cite

Mohammed Saad Qasim Alasadi, A. L., & Rua’a Ali Mahmood Alazzawi, A. L. (2023). The Portrait of the Trickster in Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest . Lark, 15(6), 786-777. https://doi.org/10.31185/lark.Vol3.Iss51.3236